Tuesday, December 28, 2010

My "Pound Puppies" (w/Pics)

"Jam Session" (because my husband is a musician...)
"Pepper" (because "Piper"--the name I really liked--is a girl's name...)

 

We adopted our two dogs in May 2002 and December 2007 from the Detroit shelters--the Michigan Humane Society and the Detroit Dog Pound.

Remember those toys from about ten or so years ago called "Pound Puppies"? That's what I call my shelter dogs--my "pound puppies". They aren't really puppies anymore--"Jam" is about 9 1/2 years old and "Pepper" is about 6 years old.

I don't have anything against people purchasing pure-bred dogs--especially if they want/love a particular breed or they show dogs or breed dogs professionally.

However, our dogs are just our very spoiled house pets, and buying "new" just didn't make sense when there were so many "gently used" beautiful and loving dogs who needed and wanted homes--even if the dogs are mutts of questionable parentage. Plus, the $100 it cost for adoption (which included shots and neutering) was WAY less than the hundreds of $$$ it would cost for a purebred.

Both of our dogs were even already housebroken when we adopted them--a pleasant surprise! Jam Session (80 lbs.) is mostly a Hungarian Pointer (Vizsla) and Pepper (20 lbs.) is mostly a spaniel/terrier something-or-other. They get along beautifully. Pepper, younger and smaller, acts more like a guard dog protecting the house; while Jam is content to be "Jabba the Hut" on the sofa.

They get a Beggin' Strip every day at noon; and dinner is usually about 5. I work from my home office and at 11:57am and 4:57pm, I look down at my feet and there they are-waiting not too patiently. I swear they can tell time!

Unless you have a special reason for getting a purebred dog, consider adopting a homeless mutt. You will be rewarded over and over and over. It's almost as if they know what the alternative to adoption would have been.

 

 

 

Posted via email from The DSpot Redeux Blog

Monday, December 27, 2010

Happy Kwanzaa! Day 2: Habara Gani? Kujichagulia (Self-Determination)

 

Kwanzaa Daily Greeting: Habara Gani? (What's the news?) 

Daily Answer: the name of the Principle of the Day


The second Principle of Kwanzaa is "Kujichagulia" which is Swahili for  "Self-Determination".

To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves.  

You have choices: you can either name and define yourself or let others name and define you.

You have choices: you can either create your own life or just a consumer of what others decide you should have.

You have choices: you can either speak for yourself or let others tell your life story and history.

 

Kwanzaa is an African-American and Pan-African cultural holiday

celebrated annually worldwide from December 26 - January 1st.

It was founded in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga to celebrate and reaffirm the roots of people of the African Diaspora in the culture of Africa. Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday or a "Black Christmas". It is a celebration of family,  community and  culture for all people of African descent.

(For more information on Kwanzaa, please refer to the Official Kwanzaa Website from which much of this information is paraphrased.)

 

The Symbols of Kwanzaa


A special table is set up during Kwanzaa in a place of honor in the home, community center or wherever Kwanzaa will be celebrated. The Kwanzaa table setting consists of symbols that hold a special cultural meaning to people of the African Diaspora:

Mazao (The Crops): Food from the harvest is placed on the table to symbolize and celebrate the rewards of productive and collective labor.

Mkeka (The Mat): A woven mat is placed on the table as the foundation for the other symbols to celebrate tradition, history and our foundation.

Kinara (The Candle Holder): A wooden (preferably hand-carved) candle holder symbolizes continental Africans.

Muhindi (The Corn): The corn (preferably native corn) symbolizes children today and in the future. It is traditional for the family to have a ear of corn for each child.

Mishamaa Saba (The Seven Candles): The candles symbolize the Nguzo Saba (the Seven Principles) and one candle is lit each night of Kwanzaa until all candles are lit. The candles are lit left/right/left/right, etc. until the last night of Kwanzaa when the middle black candle is lit last.

Kikombe cha Umoja (The Unity Cup): A symbol of the communal spirit of the people of the African Diaspora.

Zawadi (The Gifts): These may include small hand-made gifts for and/or commitments to parents to children and all to the community fior the coming year.

 

"Kwanzaa" is taken from the Swahili phrase, matunda ya kwanza, which  means "first fruits".

Kwanzaa celebrations are based on the Nguzo Saba (Seven Principles):

 

1) Umoja (Unity); 2) Kujichagulia (Self-Determination); 3) Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility); 4) Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics); 5) Nia (Purpose); 6) Kuumba (Creativity); 7) Imani (Faith). 

Posted via email from The Black Liberal Boomer Blog

Sunday, December 26, 2010

Happy Kwanzaa! Day 1: Habara Gani? Umoja (Unity)


Kwanzaa Daily Greeting: Habara Gani? (What's the news?) Daily Answer: the name of the Principle of the Day
The first principle of Kwanzaa celebrated on Day One is "Umoja" which is Swahili for "Unity".
To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.
What actions can you take locally, nationally, or internationally to promote unity?

Kwanzaa is an African-American and Pan-African cultural holiday celebrated annually worldwide from December 26 - January 1st.
It was founded in 1966 by Dr. Maulana Karenga to celebrate and reaffirm the roots of people of the African Diaspora in the culture of Africa. Kwanzaa is not a religious holiday or a "Black Christmas". It is a celebration of family,  community and  culture for all people of African descent.
(For more information on Kwanzaa, please refer to the Official Kwanzaa Website from which much of this information is paraphrased.)
Although gifts may be exchanged, the wanton commercialization of gift-giving and the giving of store-bought presents are both inappropriate for Kwanzaa. Homemade gifts and/or donations of time and/or money to community groups is how Kwanzaa is celebrated.
"Kwanzaa" is taken from the Swahili phrase, matunda ya kwanza, which  means "first fruits". Kwanzaa celebrations are based on the Nguzo Saba (Seven Principles):
1) Umoja (Unity); 2) Kujichagulia (Self-Determination); 3) Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility); 4) Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics); 5) Nia (Purpose); 6) Kuumba (Creativity); 7) Imani (Faith).

Thursday, December 16, 2010

Slows-to-Go Bar-B-Q Now Open in Midtown Detroit!

http://goo.gl/maps/EtCc

 

Still cold? Slows-to-Go Bar-B-Q is now open in the Midtown Area of Detroit and ready for take out with great food and service!

4107 Cass Avenue

Detroit MI 48202

Chef Brian says:

SLOWS TO GO, located at the corner of Alexandrine and Cass Avenue in Detroit’s thriving Midtown district will soon be available as your go to answer for barbecue TO GO.  This place is built to kick out some seriously large amounts of delectable, flavorful, some say over-the-top Detroit barbecue, SLOWS style.  Over the Top like Sly in that sweet movie of the same name.

I’m putting together some new menu items that will only be available at SLOWS TO GO. We are planning on bringing some specials on line once we are up and running.  If you didn’t know, our ability to add menu items at SLOWS BAR BQ has been limited by a small kitchen and your demand (THANK YOU!).  Now we can stretch out in our new kitchen at SLOWS TO GO.  That’s exciting.

Slows Bar-B-Q is a true Detroit gem and success story with its original location in southwest Detroit. Now you can come to Midtown and get some 'que to go while you do your holiday shopping at the independent local retailers of the University Cultural Center!


Posted via email from The DSpot Redeux Blog

Wednesday, December 15, 2010

Wordless Wednesday: Cold Weather? Go Iceskating!

Do you know that Campus Martius Park Skating Rink in Detroit is LARGER than the one at 30Rock in NYC?

RINK HOURS (November 20, 2010 thru Jan 2):

Monday - Thursday 11am - 10pm

Friday 11am - Midnight

Saturday 10am - Midnight

Sunday 12pm - 8pm

RINK HOURS (Jan 3 thru March 6, 2011):

Monday - Thursday 11am - 9pm

Friday 11am - midnight

Saturday 10am -11pm

Sunday 12pm - 8pm

 

ADMISSION PRICES (2010-2011 winter season):

Adults 13 Years to 49 Years $7

Children 12 Years and younger $6

Seniors 50 Years and Older $6

Skate Rental $3

Shoe Check available for people with their own skates $2

Skate Sharpening $10

Posted via email from The DSpot Redeux Blog

Monday, December 13, 2010

Today in Black History

Did you know on December 13:

in 1944 saw the inclusion of Black women into the U.S. Women's Naval Corps (WAVES).

in 1957 the first ambassador from the newly-independent African nation of Ghana to the United States, Daniel A. Chapman was installed.

Posted via email from The Black Liberal Boomer Blog

Monday Milestones: Detroit Artists Market

I did not know until recently that the DAM (Detroit Artists Market), now located at 4719 Woodward Avenue in the Detroit Midtown Cultural Center, began way back in the Depression Days!

The Detroit Artists Market and all of the stores and shops in Midtown are open for your holiday shopping! Support your local businesses and get original and unique gifts this year!

From the DAM website

The Detroit Artists Market (DAM) was founded in 1932, in the midst of the Great Depression.  A group of local art patrons, led by Mrs. H. Lee Simpson, recognized that local artists needed a place to exhibit and sell their work.

Originally called Detroit Young Artists Market, the gallery was created to provide a source of income for artists under the age of 30. In 1936, the gallery’s name changed to Detroit Artists Market (DAM), which reflected the growth of the organization as it began to exhibit both emerging and established Detroit artists of all ages and stature.  In addition to providing artists with the means of a livelihood, DAM’s founders had another goal: educating public taste through the exhibition and sale of work by the finest of Detroit’s local artists.  DAM ran solely on the help of volunteers and board members, up until the first salaried manager in 1969.

Today, the gallery is rooted in the history of Detroit art and culture, and continues to be one of the finest nonprofit contemporary art galleries in the Midwest.  DAM has a distinguished history of creating a lively culture characterized by experimentation and artistic creativity.

Posted via email from The DSpot Redeux Blog

Monday, December 6, 2010

Today in Black History: December 6 2010

Today's Black History Facts:

1) 1869:the Colored National Labor Convention, the first Black U.S. labor organization met in Washington, D.C.

2) 1871: P.B.S. Pinchback was elected President Pro Tem of the Louisana Senate and acting Lieutenant Governor.

3)  1963: Dr. Ralph Bunche (Detroit native and Nobel Peace Prize winner) and Miss Marian Anderson (Opera singer) were presented the Medal of Freedom by President Lyndon Johnson. The award was announced by President John F. Kennedy who was killed before the award was presented.

Posted via email from The Black Liberal Boomer Blog