Monday, September 14, 2009

Mondays Milestones: Bill Cosby visits Detroit


On Sunday, September 13, 2009, Bill Cosby, the comedian-turned-education advocate attracted dozens of parents and students to the Detroit Public Library main branch, 5201 Woodward, where he spoke a message urging students, parents and Metro Detroiters to become more responsible for improving their city. The visit as well as an upcoming series of commercials is part of the Detroit Public Schools "I'm In" campaign, aimed at reversing the decline in the district's student population.

While much of Cosby's focus were on the commercials, he vented between tapings about his frustrations with public corruption in Detroit, complacent parents and teenagers with bad attitudes.

An example of the negative mentality that plagues the Motor City and hold Detroit back comes from online Detroit Free Press reader Mclara2, who commented on Cosby's presence in Detroit by saying, "Will somebody tell Bill Cosby what time it is? It's time for him to retire. He is NOT a social commentator. He is a comedian and a billionaire. His best work comes from the charities he funds. Not from his lectures to the poor."
Fortunately some recognize the importance of attitude as well as Cosby's message. Another online reader, Sosorryu812 in response to Mclara2: "Now this is the typical Detroit attitude.............no wonder Detroit is [considered] the very worst city in the United States of America to live in."
Oscar Sanchez-Martinez, 8, a student at Ann Arbor Trail in Detroit, shares a moment with Bill Cosby on Sunday before taping a public service announcement at the main branch of the Detroit Public Library in Detroit. The TV spots are part of the public schools' "I'm In" campaign. (SUSAN TUSA/Detroit Free Press)
"There are too many people hiding, saying nothing," Cosby said. "People need to know there is a community there for them."
In the spirit of community and as an agent of change I leave you with this poem. Maybe with a change in our attitudes the Motor City can become motivated to take action and bring about the progress we all envision and hope for.
ATTITUDE
The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on my life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company, a church, a home. The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. We cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way. We cannot change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play on the one string we have, and that is our attitude. I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it. And so it is with you. We are in charge of our attitudes. ---Charles Swindell


On Sunday, September 13, 2009, Bill Cosby, the comedian-turned-education advocate attracted dozens of parents and students to the Detroit Public Library main branch, 5201 Woodward, where he spoke a message urging students, parents and Metro Detroiters to become more responsible for improving their city. The visit as well as an upcoming series of commercials is part of the Detroit Public Schools "I'm In" campaign, aimed at reversing the decline in the district's student population.

While much of Cosby's focus were on the commercials, he vented between tapings about his frustrations with public corruption in Detroit, complacent parents and teenagers with bad attitudes.

An example of the negative mentality that plagues the Motor City and hold Detroit back comes from online Detroit Free Press reader Mclara2, who commented on Cosby's presence in Detroit by saying, "Will somebody tell Bill Cosby what time it is? It's time for him to retire. He is NOT a social commentator. He is a comedian and a billionaire. His best work comes from the charities he funds. Not from his lectures to the poor."
Fortunately some recognize the importance of attitude as well as Cosby's message. Another online reader, Sosorryu812 replied: "Now this is the typical Detroit attitude.............no wonder Detroit is [considered] the very worst city in the United States of America to live in."
Oscar Sanchez-Martinez, 8, a student at Ann Arbor Trail in Detroit, shares a moment with Bill Cosby on Sunday before taping a public service announcement at the main branch of the Detroit Public Library in Detroit. The TV spots are part of the public schools' "I'm In" campaign. (SUSAN TUSA/Detroit Free Press)
"There are too many people hiding, saying nothing," Cosby said. "People need to know there is a community there for them."
In the spirit of community and as an agent of change I leave you with this poem. Maybe with a change in our attitudes the Motor City can become motivated to take action and bring about the progress we all envision and hope for.
ATTITUDE
The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on my life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company, a church, a home. The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. We cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way. We cannot change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play on the one string we have, and that is our attitude. I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it. And so it is with you. We are in charge of our attitudes. ---Charles Swindell

No comments:

Post a Comment

Thank you for your comments! Your email address will not be shown or shared!
Due to overwhelming spam comments, this comment forum will now be moderated. No more "anonymous" comments will be allowed.