Wednesday, September 30, 2009

Wordless Wednesday: Detroit Startup Resources

Tuesday, September 29, 2009

Redeux News: Grocery Store Tax Incentive Has Potential to Create More Than 3,000 Jobs and $852 Million in Sales

The Michigan departments of Agriculture (MDA) and Treasury today released information on Public Act 231, which amends the Commercial Rehabilitation Act, a new tool geared to support grocery store development and give citizens better access to fresh food through tax incentives. Under the program, certain retail food establishments that expand, improve, or open in underserved areas may request that those improvements not be taxed for up to 10 years. It is estimated PA 231 has the potential to generate economic growth that could lead to approximately $852 million in sales and 3,020 additional jobs in Michigan.

Underserved areas can be found in both urban and rural communities. Under the statute, MDA is required to identify "Underserved Areas" using three criteria for Census Tracts in the definition: (1) low and moderate income, (2) below average density of grocery stores and (3) travel limitations to grocery stores.

These areas are characterized by limited access to food retail establishments that offer fresh and frozen food options such as meat and poultry, fruits & vegetables, and dairy products. Retail food establishments in underserved areas, especially in urban and rural settings, face unique operating challenges that can drive up operating costs. Tax incentives can reduce overhead costs, which can improve a business's cash flow and overall operation.

"This program provides another incentive to encourage businesses to grow here in Michigan," said State Treasurer Robert J. Kleine. "The program serves the dual purpose of creating jobs and broadening access to healthy food items families need."

A recent report by Michigan Food Policy Council recommended that tax incentives be considered as the state works to address underserved areas and increase the number of retail outlets with fresh food options. Many studies have documented increased rates of diet-related diseases, such as diabetes and obesity, in neighborhoods where citizens lack adequate access to fresh food options.

"Grocery store development in underserved areas has the potential to create a positive ripple effect in Michigan, including jobs and community economic development, while combating one potential factor in the diet-related disease rates we see today," said Kirsten Simmons, executive director of the Michigan Food Policy Council.

Forms and information on designated underserved areas are available online at the Michigan Department of Treasury's website at www.michigan.gov/propertytaxexemptions.


Contact:
Terry Stanton, (517) 335-2167


Eat/ Shop Detroit: Greenopia

Greenopia Detroit provides consumers with high quality information to help them reduce their impact on the environment through their daily purchasing decisions. Greenopia publishes extensive green business directories, product directories, and brand directories, as well as offering a growing community, news articles, blogs, and tips to help Detroiters eat, shop, and live green.

Here are five quick ways to get some greens in your diet every day. The following tips were provided by writer Starre Vartan of Greenopia:

Green Food Bars: There are a plethora of green food bars on the market, and some of them are actually quite tasty. Covered in chocolate, layered with peanut butter or dried fruit, mixed with other veggies, or mostly solo, there are tons of options, and most of them squeeze a very generous serving of greens into one bar.

Smoothies: The very easiest way to 'sneak' greens into a diet is by adding them to a regular breakfast or snack smoothie. It sounds bizarre, but next time you whip up your fave blended concoction, throw a handful of organic baby spinach, watercress, or Swiss chard (leaves only) into the blender along with your favorite combination of yogurt, soymilk, and fruit. Most people can't taste the greens, or they're barely noticable if you do detect them. This works especially well for kids!

Make Them Taste Great: When greens are cooked well (that means not overcooked) and seasoned right, they can actually taste delicious. Try lightly sauteeing Swiss chard in extra-virgin olive oil and fresh garlic for 5-6 minutes and sprinkling with sea salt, adding spinach to bean soups right at the end (literally the last minute or so of cooking) so it doesn't get mushy, or mincing fresh organic parsley and mixing with lemon juice, olive oil, salt and pepper for a refreshing sandwich topping or side dish.

Mashed root veggies: Mashed potatoes, yams, turnips and other root vegetables are popular Autumn and Winter dishes. Often mixed with a bit of butter, milk, salt and pepper, consider tossing some greens in before you get the blender going. The heat from the just-cooked potatoes or turnips will soften the chosen leaves, and once mixed with the usual ingredients, you won't be able to taste their addition (though in mashed potatoes they will add a green hue!)

Add To Favorite Dishes: Think your family will boycott dinner if there are some greens on favorites like pizza or in the special-recipe cheesy lasagna? No way. They and you will barely notice that they're getting some "leafies" while enjoying "fun" meals. Try mincing a bit of chard into burritos, or mixing finely chopped spinach into meatballs or hamburgers.


Visit http://www.greenopia.com/DT/ for more information.

Monday, September 28, 2009

Redeux News: Lions Get to Roar Again

Lions QB Matthew Stafford saluted the crowd's applause as he walked off their field after the Lions' 19-14 win over the Redskins Sunday afternoon at Ford Field.   (JULIAN H. GONZALEZ / DFP)

Lions QB Matthew Stafford saluted the crowd's applause as he walked off their field after the Lions' 19-14 win over the Redskins Sunday afternoon at Ford Field. (JULIAN H. GONZALEZ / Detroit Free Press)


After 644 losing days, 21 losing months, 18 losing Sundays, 1 losing Thursday, 4 starting quarterbacks, a fired coach, a tar-and-feathered team president and a million bad jokes about Detroit futility...the Lions finally broke their losing streak.

Although the game was blacked out (not aired on TV for Detroit, Michigan fans) on Sunday afternoon, before their smallest crowd since Ford Field opened, Detroit, the losingest team in pro football, outlasted Washington, 19-14, surviving a last-second sandlot play that almost sent the whole building — including the owners into a blaze of both pride and relief. On the field the players and fans went crazy. Players raced into the locker room, celebrated, then minutes later came back out to share their victory with the media.

Milestone Monday: Life and Legacy of Dr. Ossian Sweet

Ossian Sweet was an American physician. He is most notable for defending his home in 1925 in a predominantly white neighborhood against a mob attempting to force him out of his newly-purchased house in Detroit, Michigan, and the subsequent acquittal of murder charges, which included charges to his family and friends who helped him to defend his home, by an all-white jury, a historic event which came to be known as the Sweet Trials.




Dr. Ossian Sweet purchased this Detroit home on Garland and Charlevoix so he could bring up his daughter in good surroundings.


Early years

The importance of examining Ossian Sweet's childhood provides an understanding of the events that shaped Mr. Sweet's life. At age 6, he witnessed a lynching. He grew up in a community where most of the populace worked in the phosphate mines under near slave-like conditions: Twelve-hour days, six days a week, at one dollar a day. The repression of blacks, the shootings, and the lynchings made an indelible impression on the boy. These psychological scars persisted into his adulthood, when race riots that he witnessed added to his fears. Most importantly, these childhood events formed the basis for his defense against the murder charge that is at the core of his story.

Education

In September 1909, Sweet left Florida at age thirteen. He was sent to Wilberforce University in Xenia, Ohio. Wilberforce University was one of few African American colleges of that time and was funded by the African Methodist Episcopal Church (AME). From Wilberforce University, Ossian attended Howard University in Washington D.C. where he earned his medical accreditation.

Ossian Sweet was attending Howard University, a leader in black medical education, in 1919 when he personally witnessed the Washington D.C. race riot. Like so many cities in thesummer of 1910, Washington D.C. had been stretched to its breaking point. Black migrants from the south had come pouring into the city's main black areas with the promise of wartime jobs, but in 1919 with the end of the war the promise was no longer there, although new migrants were pouring into the city everyday.

Detroit & Black Bottom

Ossian arrived in Detroit in the late summer of 1921. By 1910 Detroit was reported to be on its way to become an industrial powerhouse. A booming modern metropolis paved the way for the growth of the auto industry; around 1913, the pull for jobs on the assembly lines fueled enormous migration to Detroit. In 1910, the population of Detroit was approximately 485,000; by 1920 it had more than doubled. As migration increased, so did segregation. Black Bottom was an overpopulated black ghetto in which migrant workers from the South made their homes during the Great Migration.

"Despite its name, Black Bottom wasn't really a colored area. Most of its residents were immigrants, not Negros. Black Bottom was a neighborhood of the poor working class people of Detroit.

Career

Even with his extensive medical knowledge, Sweet encountered difficulty finding work at a hospital due to his race, but his summers waiting at Detroit restaurants instilled him with the knowledge of Black Bottom’s need for medical care. According to Kevin Boyle in Arc of Justice, “rudimentary care could have saved some of them, but Black Bottom didn’t get even that.” Sweet saw this as an opportunity to practice his medicine

Personal Life

Sweet married Gladys Mitchell in 1922. She was born in Pittsburgh and had been raised in Detroit, a few miles north of Garland, and came from a prominent middle class black family. On October 6, 1923, the newly-wed couple traveled to Europe for Mr. Sweet to continue his studies. While he did not receive a degree for his study and extended stay in Europe, it brought him the prestige he sought to further his claim of being part of the “talented tenth” of black society. His only experience with prejudice while there was at the American Hospital in which he donated a relatively large amount of money, 300 francs, given his finances. When seeking to reserve space for his wife to deliver their baby, the American Hospital refused on the grounds that the white Americans in the hospital did not want to be mixed with black patients. On May 29, 1924, Gladys gave birth to Marguerite, who they later called Iva.

Garland Avenue Bungalow

Once in Detroit, Sweet started work at Dunbar Hospital, Detroit’s first black hospital. By the spring of 1925 he had saved enough to purchase a home on Garland for $18,500 with a down payment of $3,500 cash. Mr.Sweet moved his family in 1925 from his wife’s parent’s home in an all-white neighborhood, to 2905 Garland Street, another all-white neighborhood at Garland and Charlevoix. Sweet liked the house, not only because of its appearance and size, but also for what the house represented. Most African Americans lived in Black Bottom, but those who prospered moved to better neighborhoods, which is what Sweet wanted for his own family. The home was close to Ossian's office and to Gladys's parents' home. The owners of the home saw the Sweets as an opportunity to make more than the bungalow would have brought if sold to a white family. On June 7, 1925, the Sweets bought the house for US$18,500 which about US$6,000 more than the house's fair market value. The Sweets moved into the house on September 8, 1925.

Home invasion

There were dangerous occurrences happening to friends and acquaintances of Ossian in buying homes in "white" neighborhoods including being attacked. Waterworks Park Improvement, a group ran by real estate agents from Detroit and nearby cities, whose sole reason of existence was to create controversy against the notion of allowing blacks to move into white neighborhoods.

Fearing an attack, Ossian had nine other men at his house on the night of the attack to help defend his family and property should any violence arise. The men included: Charles Washington (insurance man), Leonard Morse (colleague), William Davis, Henry Sweet (Ossian's brother), John Latting (Henry's college friend), Norris Murray (handyman), Otis Sweet (Ossian's brother) and Joe Mack (chauffeur). Gladys, too, was inside the bungalow. Inspector Norton Schuknecht had been placed outside the Sweet's house on the first night and he was to keep the peace and protect Ossian and Gladys from any angry neighbors.

On the second night,"The street was a sea of humanity," Otis recalled. "The crowd was so thick you couldn't see the street or the sidewalk. Just getting to the front door was like running the gantlet. I was hit by a rock before I got inside."

At about 10 p.m. a series of shots rang out from the Sweet home. A neighbor and member of the mob, Eric Houghberg, was shot and suffered a minor injury. The other man who was hit, Leon Breiner, was killed from the shot. By the next morning, September 10, the story was on newsstands all across Detroit and throughout the country.

Trial

The NAACP promised to defend Dr. Sweet, his wife and friends and brought in Clarence Darrow, a titan of the American bar for more than three decades, as chief counsel. His assistants included Arthur Garfield Hays, one of the nation's leading liberal lawyers, and Walter M. Nelson, a Detroiter.

Presiding over the trial was a young judge named Frank Murphy, who would go on to become mayor of Detroit, governor of Michigan, U.S. Attorney General and a justice of the U.S. Supreme Court.

Afterward Murphy said, "This was the greatest experience of my life. This was Clarence Darrow at his best. I will never see anything like it again."

The facts in the case were relatively simple: Someone in Dr. Sweet's house fired a shot that killed Leon Breiner. Another neighborhood resident, Erik Hofberg, received a bullet in the leg.

Judge Frank Murphy presided over the trial and, in his charge to the jury, made it clear that the right to defend one's home applied to blacks as well as whites.

Judge Frank Murphy presided over the trial and, in his charge to the jury, made it clear that the right to defend one's home applied to blacks as well as whites.

But the issue was far more complicated: Had there been justification for firing that shot?

In his book "Let Freedom Ring," defense attorney Hays left a graphic memoir of the case. "Colored people regarded the case as one which raised the definite question of race segregation. The claim was made that the shots were fired in defense of the home. It was pointed out that in Detroit, the Negro population had vastly increased in numbers; that Negro districts had become congested and were centers of filth and squalor; that it was almost impossible for a Negro to obtain a decent home except in a white neighborhood; that the whites were always hostile and the colored man was ordinarily either compelled to move or to use force to protect himself."

A Detroit News reporter, Philip A. Adler, testified for the defense. He was at the scene of the shooting and told of a "considerable mob" of between "400 and 500," and stones hitting the house "like hail."

"I heard someone say, 'A Negro family has moved in here and we're going to get them out'," Adler testified. "I asked a policeman what the trouble was and he told me it was none of my business."

The defense hammered hard at the purpose of the Water Works Improvement Association and its goal to keep blacks out. In 1925 the Ku Klux Klan claimed 100,000 members in Detroit and a cross had recently been burned at the steps of city hall.

Darrow's key question to Sweet during the trial: "What was your state of mind at the time of the shooting?"

Sweet replied, "When I opened the door and saw the mob, I realized I was facing the same mob that had hounded my people throughout its entire history. In my mind I was pretty confident of what I was up against. I had my back against the wall. I was filled with a peculiar fear, the fear of one who knows the history of my race. I knew what mobs had done to my people before."

In his charge to the jury Judge Murphy indicated clearly his belief that a man's home is his castle and that no one has a right to invade it. He left no question of the right to shoot when one has reasonable grounds to fear that his life or property is in danger. And he made it clear that these rights belong to blacks as well as to whites.

The jury deliberated for 46 hours, then announced that it had been unable to reach a verdict. The prosecution was not ready to give up, and elected to press charges against a single defendent, Henry Sweet, the 21-year-old brother of Ossian. The state believed he fired the shot that killed Leon Breiner. The second trial in many ways was parallel to the first.

The jury found Henry Sweet innocent after less than four hours deliberation. No further effort was made to prosecute any of the defendants. After all charges were dropped against him, Ossian Sweet moved back into his home on Garland.

The Aftermath

After Henry was acquitted, life for the Sweets was not as joyous as hoped. Both Gladys and her daughter, Iva, were suffering from tuberculosis, which Gladys contracted during her incarceration. Two months after Iva turned two, she died. The two years following this occurrence, Ossian and Gladys lived apart from one another; he was back at the apartment near Dunbar Memorial and she was in Tucson, trying to recover from tuberculosis in a drier climate.

By mid 1928, Ossian finally regained possession of the bungalow, which had not been lived in since the shooting. A few months after Gladys returned home, she died, at the age of twenty-seven. After the death of his wife, Ossian bought the Garafalo's Drugstore. In 1929, he left his practice to run a hospital in the heart of the ghetto. He would eventually run a few of these small hospitals, but none ever flourished. As he began to approach the age of fifty, Ossian started to buy land in East Bartow, where his father had first bought land. Finally, in 1930, he decided to run for the presidency of the NAACP branch in Detroit, he lost by a wide margin.

Unfortunately, in the summer of 1939, Ossian realized that his brother had contracted the same horrible disease that had taken the life of his wife and daughter, tuberculosis. Six months later, Ossian's brother died. By this point, Ossian's finances soon failed him. It took him until 1950 to pay off the land contract and he then assumed full ownership of the bungalow. He faced too much debt after that and, instead of losing the house, Ossian sold it in April 1958, to another black family. With the bungalow out of his possession, he transformed what had been his office above Garafalo's Drugstore into an apartment. Around this time, Ossian's physical and mental health began to decline; he had put on weight and had slowed down in his motions. The man that once displayed maturity and strength now seemed bitter and dark. On March 20, 1960, he went into his bedroom and committed suicide with a shot to the head.

Malice Aforethought: The Sweet Trials is a play written by Arthur Beer, a professor and performing arts co-chair of the University of Detroit Mercy, which tells the story of Ossian Sweet and the murder trial he, his family, and friends faced, commonly known as the Sweet Trials back in 1924.

This play serves an important historical role not only in the history of Detroit, where the incident and trials were held, but also in the History of the United States, since it was the first trial where any African American was acquitted of murder. Initially performed in 1987, the play was recently brought back in 2007, for its 20 year anniversary. The play offers a truly unique experience allowing guests to observe and “re-live” a trial of tribulations in which the Sweets and friends faced over 80 years ago.

The Sweet home as it looks today.

(This story was compiled using clips and photo files of the Detroit News. )

Friday, September 25, 2009

Old School Friday: A Tribute to Black Moses

Isaac and Jesse LIVE
in 1973: BIG 'Fro, MANY Chains, and All! 
"Shut Yo' Mouth--but I'm talkin' 'bout Shaft!"













Wednesday, September 23, 2009

Wordless Wednesday: Take Some Time...

There is still time for you to take a break 
and just chill...








Detroit Riverwalk





Campus Martius







Friday, September 18, 2009

Old School Friday: Criminal Records

If "Criminal" is the OSF topic, only ONE video makes the cut...
"Smooth Criminal"---R.I.P. Michael

(Lyrics included...)


Wednesday, September 16, 2009

Wordless Wednesday: Plan on Staying in Business

Patronize these Detroit Gems to keep them in business!

Seldom Blues Hours

Monday- Friday Lunch: 11:30 am-4 pm
Monday-Thursday Dinner: 4 pm- 10pm Bar: 11pm
Friday & Saturday Dinner: 4 pm- 12am Bar: 1 am
Sunday Brunch: 11:30 am- 4 pm Bar: Closed



Detroit Breakfast House & Grill Hours

Open Mon-Thu 7:30am-3pm
Fri 7:30am-4pm
Sat 8am-5pm
Sun 8am-4pm 






Southern Hospitality Restaurant Group, owners of Detroit’s fine dining and jazz supper club Seldom Blues and the Detroit Breakfast House & Grill filed for Chapter 11 Bankruptcy on Friday, according the Detroit News. Both restaurants are expected to participate in Detroit's first annual Restaurant Week as well as remain open during their restructuring.

Tuesday, September 15, 2009

Do It In Detroit: Detroit Restaurant Week

Finally a chance for Detroit chefs and restaurants to shine. For the first time, from September 18- 27, 2009 the Motor City will participate in a 10 day showcase of downtown Detroit’s most outstanding chefs and cuisine. The city’s top dining establishments will offer a minimum three-course dinner for a fixed price ($27) not including beverages, tax, gratuity, and many restaurants are also offering specially-priced wine and beverage pairings to accompany the meal. The list of participating restaurants are a powerhouse of culinary expertise.
According to Sylvia Rector, Free Press Restaurant Critic, organizers are set to announce details of the event today, targeting only top-tier venues to launch what will be an annual event. In addition, Detroit’s Eastern Market will offer special Detroit Restaurant Week culinary demonstrations each Saturday morning from now through September 26.
Participating Restaurants click for more details and hours of operation

Reservations are strongly recommended. Full details, including menus will be made available today at www.DetroitRestaurantWeek.com.
Be sure to also visit the official blog of Detroit Restaurant Week, Dining in Detroit (www.diningindetroit.net). There you will find weekly updates on DRW events, as well as previews of several of the participating restaurants. You can also follow Dining in Detroit on Twitter @DininginDetroit.
More about DRW Support:

Detroit Restaurant Week is sponsored by the Greater Downtown Districts — Downtown, Midtown, New Center, Corktown and Eastern Market — to support downtown’s many fine restaurants. Social Connection and the Metro Times are also proud sponsors of DRW, which is being presented by Paxahau Promotions Group, producers of the MOVEMENT: Electronic Music Festival.
Paxahau Promotions Group was established in 1998 to promote electronic music. Since then it has grown to become a year round event production company. In addition to producing Detroit’s annual electronic music festival—Movement; Paxahau has been responsible for booking talent or producing several other events including: Comerica Cityfest; Arts, Beats & Eats; North American International Auto Show events; the Book Cadillac Grand Opening Weekend, and BravoBravo! With a network of alliances and resources that span the globe, Paxahau has earned the reputation as a premier promotions group. Visit www.paxahau.com for more information.

Monday, September 14, 2009

Mondays Milestones: Bill Cosby visits Detroit


On Sunday, September 13, 2009, Bill Cosby, the comedian-turned-education advocate attracted dozens of parents and students to the Detroit Public Library main branch, 5201 Woodward, where he spoke a message urging students, parents and Metro Detroiters to become more responsible for improving their city. The visit as well as an upcoming series of commercials is part of the Detroit Public Schools "I'm In" campaign, aimed at reversing the decline in the district's student population.

While much of Cosby's focus were on the commercials, he vented between tapings about his frustrations with public corruption in Detroit, complacent parents and teenagers with bad attitudes.

An example of the negative mentality that plagues the Motor City and hold Detroit back comes from online Detroit Free Press reader Mclara2, who commented on Cosby's presence in Detroit by saying, "Will somebody tell Bill Cosby what time it is? It's time for him to retire. He is NOT a social commentator. He is a comedian and a billionaire. His best work comes from the charities he funds. Not from his lectures to the poor."
Fortunately some recognize the importance of attitude as well as Cosby's message. Another online reader, Sosorryu812 in response to Mclara2: "Now this is the typical Detroit attitude.............no wonder Detroit is [considered] the very worst city in the United States of America to live in."
Oscar Sanchez-Martinez, 8, a student at Ann Arbor Trail in Detroit, shares a moment with Bill Cosby on Sunday before taping a public service announcement at the main branch of the Detroit Public Library in Detroit. The TV spots are part of the public schools' "I'm In" campaign. (SUSAN TUSA/Detroit Free Press)
"There are too many people hiding, saying nothing," Cosby said. "People need to know there is a community there for them."
In the spirit of community and as an agent of change I leave you with this poem. Maybe with a change in our attitudes the Motor City can become motivated to take action and bring about the progress we all envision and hope for.
ATTITUDE
The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on my life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company, a church, a home. The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. We cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way. We cannot change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play on the one string we have, and that is our attitude. I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it. And so it is with you. We are in charge of our attitudes. ---Charles Swindell


On Sunday, September 13, 2009, Bill Cosby, the comedian-turned-education advocate attracted dozens of parents and students to the Detroit Public Library main branch, 5201 Woodward, where he spoke a message urging students, parents and Metro Detroiters to become more responsible for improving their city. The visit as well as an upcoming series of commercials is part of the Detroit Public Schools "I'm In" campaign, aimed at reversing the decline in the district's student population.

While much of Cosby's focus were on the commercials, he vented between tapings about his frustrations with public corruption in Detroit, complacent parents and teenagers with bad attitudes.

An example of the negative mentality that plagues the Motor City and hold Detroit back comes from online Detroit Free Press reader Mclara2, who commented on Cosby's presence in Detroit by saying, "Will somebody tell Bill Cosby what time it is? It's time for him to retire. He is NOT a social commentator. He is a comedian and a billionaire. His best work comes from the charities he funds. Not from his lectures to the poor."
Fortunately some recognize the importance of attitude as well as Cosby's message. Another online reader, Sosorryu812 replied: "Now this is the typical Detroit attitude.............no wonder Detroit is [considered] the very worst city in the United States of America to live in."
Oscar Sanchez-Martinez, 8, a student at Ann Arbor Trail in Detroit, shares a moment with Bill Cosby on Sunday before taping a public service announcement at the main branch of the Detroit Public Library in Detroit. The TV spots are part of the public schools' "I'm In" campaign. (SUSAN TUSA/Detroit Free Press)
"There are too many people hiding, saying nothing," Cosby said. "People need to know there is a community there for them."
In the spirit of community and as an agent of change I leave you with this poem. Maybe with a change in our attitudes the Motor City can become motivated to take action and bring about the progress we all envision and hope for.
ATTITUDE
The longer I live, the more I realize the impact of attitude on my life. Attitude, to me, is more important than facts. It is more important than the past, than education, than money, than circumstances, than failures, than successes, than what other people think or say or do. It is more important than appearance, giftedness or skill. It will make or break a company, a church, a home. The remarkable thing is we have a choice every day regarding the attitude we will embrace for that day. We cannot change the fact that people will act in a certain way. We cannot change the inevitable. The only thing we can do is play on the one string we have, and that is our attitude. I am convinced that life is 10% what happens to me and 90% how I react to it. And so it is with you. We are in charge of our attitudes. ---Charles Swindell

Thursday, September 10, 2009

Redeux News: Oh No, He Di'int!

 
This is THE LOOK from the #1, #2, and #3 Americans after
Representative Joe Wilson (R-SC) called President Barack Obama a LIAR right in 
the Halls of Congress!
At least our President has CLASS (not to mention a hooked fade), 
but what was he REALLY thinking at that moment? 


Caption This Picture in the Comments Section!
BTW: Wilson's Democratic Opponent for the 2010 Election raised $100,000 overnight!
Donate here to help vote Joe Wilson out of office:

Do it in Detroit: The UniverSoul Circus is Back!


The UniverSoul Circus, also now as the most interactive circus in the world, is making its annual appearance in Detroit at Chene Park. The UniverSoul Circus has entertained families and groups of all ages since 1994. It is the only African-American owned and produced single-ring circus in the world. The UniverSoul Circus will be performing in the Motor City at Chene Park from September 9 through September 20 2009 and is currently hiring for the 2009 season. Detailed information has been included below for your convenience.

The multi-racial, multi-national UniverSoul Circus began, as a vision by the founder, Cedric Walker, to explore and present another set of the talents of black performers and entertainers. Walker has been a music producer, entrepreneur and totally self-financed the first year of the Circus. By 1997 the circus tour had grown to 10 cities, 19 cities in 1999, 31 cities in 2000, toured South Africa 2001– its first international destination, and 32 cities in 2005.

Come rain or shine Detroiters can enjoy a wonderful show as well as enjoy traditional circus items such as popcorn, peanuts, cotton candy, sno-cones, hot dogs and nachos.
Tickets for the Circus are available at the Chene Park Box Office or online. Chene Park is located along the Detroit River at 2600 E. Atwater, Detroit, MI 48207. Parking is available on the grounds. Prices are as follows:

Universoul Circus: On-Site Parking.
$7.00 per car for morning shows (10:30am only)
$10.00 per car for evenings and all shows on the week-ends. $14 per bus for morning shows (10:30am only) $20 per bus for evening shows and all shows on the week-ends.

Box Office Hours:

Chene Park Box Office is open: If no event Mon - Fri: 10AM - 6PM. Sat & Sun: Closed Event days: Mon - Sat: 10AM - 9PM Sun: 12PM Noon - 9PM Universoul Circus Box Office: 9am to 9:00pm all circus show dates Will Call tickets are available at the Box Office beginning 1 hour prior to event start time. Customer must have their Confirmation Number, Credit Card used for purchase and Photo Identification.

Accessible Seating:

Universoul Circus: Handicap accessible ramp (Box 13, 14, 27 & 28).

General Rules:

There are no Cameras or Recording Devices allowed. No long-legged beach chairs allowed except on the lawn. No cans, bottles, glass containers, alcoholic beverages or soft drinks of any kind.

Universoul Circus: No cameras, no video cameras, no strollers, no food or toys from the outside.

No smoking.

Children Rules:

All patrons must have a ticket.

Universoul Circus: 11 months and under are free, however, they must sit on an adult lap. Ages 12 months to 10 years receive $2.00 off regular price. (Discount also applies to senior citizens age 60 years and older.)

IMMEDIATE JOB OPENINGS FOR 2009 TOUR!
Send resume and cover letter to: humanresources@universoulcircus.com
or fax to 404-681-9824


Whether it's in the corporate office or traveling on the road, UniverSoul Circus has a variety of career opportunities to offer you. To find out more about a particular position, view current openings below or click here.
To apply for any position please e-mail a cover letter and resume to: humanresources@universoulcircus.com or fax to 404-681-9824
or mail to:
UniverSoul Circus
Human Resources Office
510 Whitehall St.
Atlanta, GA 30303

Job Title Job Code
HUMAN RESOURCES ASSISTANT Corporate
Senior Public Relations Manager Communications
Box Office Ticket Seller (100% Travel) Tour - Ticket Sales
Transportation Manager (100% travel) Tour - Operations
Show Driver - Class A CDL (100% travel) Operations
Van Driver (100% travel) Tour transportation
Director of Operations Operations
Field Marketing Manager (100%) Tour Marketing
General Manager - National Touring Circus (100% travel) Tour
Concessions - food prep (100% travel) Concessions
Concessions Manager (100% travel) Tour - Merchandise
Tour Accountant (100% Travel) Tour - Accounting
Concessions Cashier (100% travel) Tour

Tuesday, September 8, 2009

You Are What You Eat Michiganders!

On Tuesday, August 25, 2009, Jennifer Granholm stood outside of Peaches & Greens, a local Detroit produce store and announced the launch of a food service program that would provide fresh produce to city neighborhoods. A much
needed service for local residents who's diets are suffering due to the recent economic recession.

Detroit has been identified as a place where quality groceries and produce are not readily available. Many Detroit residents are forced to shop for groceries at convenience stores and gas stations because there are few real grocery stores inside the city limits. Many of those have limited operating hours and inflated prices.
Gov. Jennifer Granholm

The innovative program labeled MI (pronounced "my") Neighborhood Food Movers, is the result of a partnership between the state and three nonprofit organizations. In addition to Peaches
& Greens, Up South Foods and Field of Our Dreams
will be joining the team of produce companies that
are expected to hit the streets for a 4-month trial period.

Granholm's program, which will be funded by a $75,000 low-interest loan from the state, will deliver fruits and vegetables to residents with a vendor-style truck, according to the Detroit Free Press. When the produce truck, which will bear a MI Neighborhood Food Movers logo, roves through neighborhoods on a fixed route and schedule, residents in Michigan’s largest city will have the option of healthier food choices and easier access to fresh fruits and vegetables.

Food Movers is focusing on three areas: one bounded by Woodward Ave., Dexter, W. Grand Blvd. and Glendale; the Jefferson/Chalmers area on the East Side; and Forest, E. Jefferson, Mt. Elliott and Conner. Some Detroiters counter that the program may not be successful due to the limitations to routes as well as the "lackadaisical" mentality of many Detroiters who don't seem to take well to programs no matter the convenience or benefit to their overall health.

Jocelyn Harris, 59, a Detroiter who is the proprietor of Up South Foods, appeared overjoyed with the announcement. "This is a miraculous day indeed for many Detroit residents and a dream come true for me," said the former Detroit science teacher. "I can feel this project is destined for greatness."

After the 4-month trial period, the Food Movers program is expected to be able to expand to include more local vendors covering a broader range of geographic areas.